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SENIORS

Senior citizens are using technology more than ever before. Seniors are among the prime target for cybercrimes. Because of their vulnerability and their savings.

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Frequently Asked Questions

  • Seniors
  • How to protect yourself from online fraud

    Medical advice:  Be sure to find out who is providing the information, know where you’re going online Many pharmaceutical companies create websites with information to sell products. Look for sites ending in .edu (for education) or .gov (for government).

    Banking Avoid:  accessing your personal or bank accounts from a public computer or kiosk, such as the public library Don’t reveal personally identifiable information such as your bank account number, social security number, or date of birth to unknown sources. When paying a bill online or making an online donation, be sure that you type the website URL into your browser instead of clicking on a link or cutting and pasting it from the email.

    Shopping: Make sure the website address starts with “HTTPS,” s stands for secure Look for the padlock icon at the bottom of your browser, which indicates that the site uses encryption Type new website URLs directly into the address bar instead of clicking on links or cutting and pasting from the email.

       
  • Types of Identity Thefts

    Medical Identity Theft. Has someone stolen or gained access to your Medicare/Medicaid or private health insurance ID or card or records? Cybercriminals will use this information to get medical services, prescriptions, or other benefits, or they may send fake bills to your health insurer to receive money/reimbursements.

    Social Security Identity Theft. Is someone using your Social Security number for fraudulent purposes? Social Security fraud and identity theft refers to a fraudster or scammer gaining access to your Social Security number and using it to receive your tax refund, secure employment, obtain a driver’s license, and/or receive unemployment benefits or any other state/federal aid.

    Deceased Identity Theft. Is someone using your deceased loved one’s personal information fraudulently? Deceased identity theft, or “ghosting,” is when a deceased individual’s personal information is used to commit fraudulent acts such as tax refund fraud, medical identity theft, driver’s license identity theft, credit card fraud, and more.

    Financial Identity Theft. Financial identity theft happens when a scammer gains access to your bank accounts, credit cards, retirement accounts, or personal information for their financial gain.

  • Identity theft tips

    Identity theft is the illegal use of someone else's personal information in order to obtain money or credit.

    Don’t use the same password twice.

    Choose a password that means something to you and you only; use strong passwords with eight characters or more that use a combination of numbers, letters, and symbols.

    Do not reveal personally identifiable information online such as your full name, telephone number, address, social security number, insurance policy number, credit card information, or doctor’s name.

    Avoid opening attachments, clicking on links, or responding to email messages from unknown senders or companies that ask for your personal information.

    When making online donations, make sure any charity you donate to is a legitimate non-profit organization and that you type in the web address instead of following a link.

    Be sure to shred bank and credit card statements before throwing them in the trash; talk to your bank about using passwords and photo identification on credit cards and bank accounts.

    Check your bank and credit card statements monthly for unusual charges.

  • How to properly report an elder fraud
    When writing your report, it’s important to think like a detective and relay financial information and tactical details about the perpetrator. If possible be ready to share: *Dates and times of activity, *Perpetrator’s financial information (bank names, account numbers), *Perpetrator’s IP addresses, *Perpetrator’s email and account names (even if it was a fake one).
  • How to make smarter decisions online?
    • - Choose a password that means something to you and you only; use strong passwords with eight characters or more that use a combination of numbers, letters, and symbols. Keep your mobile devices in your possession at all times and always be aware of your surroundings.
    • - If you use social networking sites such as Facebook, be sure to limit the amount of personal information you post online and use privacy settings to avoid sharing information widely.
    • - Most businesses or organizations don’t ask for your personal information over email. Beware of any requests to update or confirm your personal information.
    • - Avoid opening attachments, clicking on links, or responding to email messages from unknown senders or companies that ask for your personal information. Install and regularly update the security programs on your computer, such as anti­virus, and anti-spyware.
    • - These programs can help to protect the information on your computer, and can easily be purchased from software companies on the web or at your local office supply store. Beware of “free” gifts or prizes.
    • - If something is too good to be true, then it probably is. It is important to add only people you know on social media sites and programs like Skype; adding strangers could expose you and your personal information to scammers.
    -
  • How do you protect yourself from online fraud?
    • Medical advice
      • Be sure to find out who is providing the information, know where you’re going online
      • Many pharmaceutical companies create websites with information to sell products.
      • Look for sites ending in .edu (for education) or .gov (for government)
    • Banking
      • Avoid accessing your personal or bank accounts from a public computer or kiosk, such as the public library.
      • Don’t reveal personally identifiable information such as your bank account number, social security number or date of birth to unknown sources.
      • When paying a bill online or making an online donation, be sure that you type the website URL into your browser instead of clicking on a link or cutting and pasting it from the email
    • Shopping
      • Make sure the website address starts with “https,” s stands for secure
      • Look for the padlock icon at the bottom of your browser, which indicates that the site uses encryption.
      • Type new website URLs directly into the address bar instead of clicking on links or cutting and pasting from the email.
  • What are the different types of Identity Theft to be aware of?
    • - Medical Identity Theft.
      • Has someone stolen or gained access to your Medicare/Medicaid or private health insurance ID or card or records? Cybercriminals will use this information to get medical services, prescriptions, or other benefits, or they may send fake bills to your health insurer to receive money/reimbursements
    • - Social Security Identity Theft.
      • Is someone using your Social Security number for fraudulent purposes? Social Security fraud and identity theft refers to a fraudster or scammer gaining access to your Social Security number and using it to receive your tax refund, secure employment, obtain a driver’s license, and/or receive unemployment benefits or any other state/federal aid.
    • - Deceased Identity Theft.
      • Is someone using your deceased loved one’s personal information in a fraudulent manner?
      • Deceased identity theft, or “ghosting,” is when a deceased individual’s personal information to is used to commit fraudulent acts such as tax refund fraud, medical identity theft, driver’s license identity theft, credit card fraud, and more.
    • - Financial Identity Theft.
      • Financial identity theft happens when a scammer gains access to your bank accounts, credit cards, retirement accounts, or personal information for their financial gain.
  • What are some good identity theft tips to follow?
    Identity theft is the illegal use of someone else's personal information in order to obtain money or credit.
    • - Don’t use the same password twice Choose a password that means something to you and you only; use strong passwords with eight characters or more that uses a combination of numbers, letters, and symbols.
    • - Do not reveal personally identifiable information online such as your full name, telephone number, address, social security number, insurance policy number, credit card information, or doctor’s name.
    • - Avoid opening attachments, clicking on links, or responding to email messages from unknown senders or companies that ask for your personal information.
    • - When making online donations, make sure any charity you donate to is a legitimate non-profit organization and that you type in the web address instead of following a link.
    • - Be sure to shred bank and credit card statements before throwing them in the trash; talk to your bank about using passwords and photo identification on credit cards and bank accounts. Check your bank and credit card statements monthly for unusual charges.
     
  • What is phishing and how can it be prevented?
    Phishing is a scam by which an email user is duped into revealing personal or confidential information that the scammer can use illicitly or fraudulently
    • - Most organizations – banks, universities, companies, etc. - don’t ask for your personal information over email.
    • - Beware of requests to update or confirm your personal information.
    • -Do not open attachments, click links, or respond to email messages from unknown senders or companies.
    • - Don’t access your personal or banking accounts online from a public computer or kiosk. Beware of “free” prizes; if you think an offer is too good to be true, then it probably is.
    • - Make sure you change your passwords often and avoid using the same password for multiple accounts.
    • - Install and regularly update software firewall, antivirus, and anti-spyware programs.
    • - These software programs can help to protect the data on your computer, and can easily be purchased on the web or at your local office supply store.
  • What is elder fraud?
    Each year, millions of elderly Americans fall victim to some type of financial fraud or confidence scheme, including romance, lottery, and sweepstakes scams, to name a few.   Criminals will gain their targets’ trust and may communicate with them directly via computer, phone, and the mail; or indirectly through the TV and radio. Once successful, scammers are likely to keep a scheme going because of the prospect of significant financial gain. Seniors are often targeted because they tend to be trusting and polite.   They also usually have financial savings, own a home, and have good credit—all of which make them attractive to scammers. Additionally, seniors may be less inclined to report fraud because they don’t know how, or they may be too ashamed at having been scammed.   They might also be concerned that their relatives will lose confidence in their abilities to manage their own financial affairs. And when an elderly victim does report a crime, they may be unable to supply detailed information to investigators.
  • BOOKS

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    Cybersecurity training

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    DEFINITIONS

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    Cyber Seniors

    Reluctant seniors discover the wonders of the Internet with help from teenage mentors. A humorous and heartwarming feature documentary, CYBER-SENIORS adds to the important international conversation about the growing generation gap.

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